SCORING FASTPITCH SOFTBALL
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Introduction
Guidelines and Responsibilities
Proving A Box Score
Percentages and Averages
Cumulative Performance Records
Called and Forfeited Games
Scoring The Tie-Breaker
Knowing the Positions
Correctly Marking the Book
Calculating Player Stats
OFFENSE
DEFENSE
PITCHING

Statistics

Statistics Statistics

Hits

Errors Earned Runs
Extra Base Hits Putouts Charging Runs Scored
Game Ending Hits Assists Strikeouts
Fielder's Choice Double Play/Triple Play Bases On Balls
Sacrifices Throw Outs Wild Pitches/Passed Balls
Runs Batted In (RBI) Winning and Losing Pitcher
Batting Out of Order Saves
Strikeouts
Stolen Bases
Caught Stealing

 

 

Introduction


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Published by: National Softball Coaches Association

Written by Jeri Findlay, Head Softball Coach, Ball State University

Introduction

Scoring in the game of fastpitch softball seems to be as diversified as the people playing it. In order to gain some uniformity, and at the same time, clear up some questions confronting scorekeepers on a daily basis, this guide has been compiled with help from the National Baseball Writer's Association College Baseball Scoring Manual (1975), the NCAA Baseball Rules (1988), the ASA Official Guide and Rule book (1988), the NAGWS Softball Guide (1988), the A.S.A. Scorers Manual (1988), and "The High Country Athletic Conference Scoring Standards." Thanks also to Joe Herandez, Sports Information, Ball State University.

 

 

Basic Guidelines and Scorer Responsibilities

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1. The scorekeeper should remain consistently the same person throughout each game and your season. This adds consistency and credibility to your scoring.

2. The scorekeeper should treat both teams the same, deciding between hits and errors, sacrifices and fielder's choices, etc.

3 The scorerkeeper's decisions must be in agreement with governing rules and umpires' decisions.

4 The scorekeeper should get lineups early enough to have the scorebook all ready to go at game time.

5. The scorekeeper should be sure to get all substitutions including position changes from the umpire at the time of substitution.

6. The scorekeeper should notify the umpire immediately if the teams attempt to change sides before three outs.

7. The scorekeeeper should not notify umpires if the batters are batting out of order. This should be handled through appeal by the opposing team.

8. The scorekeeper should know the designated player rule in order to help prevent illegal entries and substitutions.

9. The scorekeeper should know the difference between an illegal substitute (not reported/just fix according to rules) and an ineligible substitute (someone who has already been removed from the game/forfeit).

10. The scorekeeper should notify the umpire immediately in the bottom of an inning when the home team has enough runs to win by an established run rule, and also if at the end of any complete inning after five, one team is ahead by the number stated in the run rule.

11 In the case of a protested or suspended game, the scorekeeper should make note in writing of the exact situation at the time of the interruption. The inning, score, outs, runners' positions and the count on the batter should be included.

12. The scorekeeper has the authority to make decisions on any points not specifically covered in scoring rules or these guidelines.

13. The scorer should have a current copy of the rules governing that competition and should know the rules pertinent to her responsibilities (eg: illegal re-entry, designated player, and illegal substitution).

 

 

Proving A Box Score


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A scoresheet is balanced or proven when the following formula is satisfied for both sides (teams):

At Bats (AB) + Base on Balls (BB) + Sacrifice Bunts and Flies (SAC) + On Base by Interference (INT) or Obstruction (OBS) + On by International Tie Breaker (ITB)

equals

Runs scored (R) + Left on Base (LOB) + Opponents Putouts (PO)

 

 

Percentages and Averages

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1. Winning percentage = (games won + (Games Tied X .5))/ ((games won (Games Tied X .5)) + (games lost + (Games Tied X .5)))

2. Batting average (BA) = hits / official at bats

3. Slugging average (SLA or SL%) = total bases earned on hits / official at bats

4. On base percentage (OB%) = (base on balls + hit by pitch + hits) / (sac. flies + base on balls + hit by pitch + official at bats) or (times on base earned by appearance at plate) % plate apperances (NSCA formula)

5. Stolen base percentage (SB%)= successful stolen base / stolen base attempts

6. Fielding average (FA) = (putouts + assists) / (putouts + assists + errors)

7. Earned run average (ERA) = (earned runs / innings pitched) x 7 or (earned runs x 21) / out recorded)

8. Strike ratio (pitcher's strike to ball ratio) = strikes thrown / total pitches thrown

9. Catcher's throw out average = thrown out stealing / throw out attempts

10. Total Bases = (homeruns x 3) + (triples x 2) + (doubles x 1) + all hits.

 

 

Cumulative Performance Records

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1. A consecutive hitting streak continues even without a hit if plate appearances result in a base on balls, a hit batter, defensive interference or a sacrifice bunt. A sacrifice fly ends a streak even though it is not counted as an official at bat.

2. A consecutive game hitting streak continues even without a hit if all plate appearances result in either a base on balls, hit batter, defensive interference or sacrifice bunt. A sacrifice fly ends a streak.

3. A consecutive game playing streak continues by playing one half of an inning on defense (three outs), or by completing one turn at bat. Merely being a pinch runner does not continue the streak.

4. If a player is ejected from a game before meeting any of the above requirements, her streak continues.

5. When considering curnmulative performance records, all performances in the completion of a suspended game are considered as occurring on the date when the game officially began.

 

 

Called and Forfeited Games


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In a regulation game called at the end of a complete inning, all statistics (individual and team) to the moment the game ends, stand. No winning or losing pitcher is declared in a tie.

2. A game ends at the end of the last previously completed full inning only if it is called in an incompleted inning when either

a - the visitors score to tie in the incomplete inning and the home team does not score, or

b - the visitors score to go ahead in the incomplete inning and the home team does not tie or go ahead.

Statistics in the incomplete inning in this case do not count.

3. In a forfeited game where

a - the home team is winning or the score is tied, all statistics up to the point of forfeiture stand,

b - the visiting team is leading and the game reverts back to the last completed inning, statistics up to that last completed inning stand,

c - the team winning by forfeit is also leading, winning and losing pitchers are recorded,

d - the team winning by forfeit is behind or if the score is tied, do not credit winning or losing pitchers and score the game 7-0, and

e - a forfeit occurs before it becomes regulation, no statistics will stand, the forfeit is recorded as a loss, and score the game 7-0 in favor of the team that did not forfeit.

 

 

Offense: Statistics


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The following offensive statistics can be kept on each player:

a - Games played (C),

b - Times at bat (AS) - do not include sacrifice bunts, sacrifice flies, hit by pitch, base on balls, gaining first base by interference or obstruction, or an incomplete turn at bat,

c - Plate appearances (PA),

d - Number of runs scored (R),

e - Number of safe hits (H) - separate doubles (2B), triples (3B) and homeruns (HR),

f - Number of runs batted in (RET's),

g - Total bases on safe hits (TB),

h - Stolen bases (SB), stolen base attempts (SBA), caught stealing (CS),

i - Sacrifice bunts (SAC-B) and sacrifice flies (SAC-F),

j - Total bases on bails (BE) - separate listing of intentional bases on balls (1DB),

k - Number of times hit by pitch (HBP),

l - Number of stril.zeouts (SO),

m - Number of times awarded first base for interference or obstruction (TNT., CBS),

n - Number of times left on base (LOB)- include a batter baserunner whose batted ball results in another runner being the third out,

o - Number of game winning runs batted in (GWRSI),

p - Number of fly outs (FO),

q - Number of ground outs (GO),

r - Batting average (BA),

5- Slugging average (SLA or

t - On base percentage (OB%), and

u - Stolen base average (SB%).

 

 

Offense: Hits


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Credit a hit

1. when a batter advances safely to any base on a fair ball which settles on the ground or touches a fence before being touched by a fielder, or which clears a fence even if touched by a fielder,

2. when a batter advances safely to any base on a fair ball hit with such force (not enough time to react), or so slowly (more than ordinary effort is necessary to throw batter out), that more than a routine play is required to put out the batter or runner,

a - do not anticipate that an off-balance throw would have retired a runner; this is a hit, even if the throw is wild,

b - when a grounder is fielded and no throw is made, credit a base hit unless no throw is made because of checldng or holding another runner,

c - if a slow or hard hit ball is deflected and thus eliminates a routine play for another fielder, credit a base hit,

d - if a play is made on a lead runner unsuccessfully and the batter would have been safe had the play been made on her, credit a hit (even on an attempted sac'ifice bunt or slap hit, or running slap),

e - if a runner interferes with a batted ball, but the batter would have been safe without the interference, credit a hit,

f - if the ball is not touched because of confusion as to whom should have fielded it, or because a fly ball was misjudged and the fielder could not recover in time to gain good position, credit a hit,

3. when a batter advances safely to any base on a fair bail which takes an unnatural bounce (short hop) so it cannot be handled with ordinary effort, or which bounces off the pitching rubber or a base before being touched by a fielder and at an angle so that it cannot be handled with ordinary effort,

4. when a batter advances safely to any base on a ball which reaches the outfield untouched by the infield unless the ball should have b~n handled by the infielder with ordinary effort (e.g., ball between legs),

5. when a batter advances safely on any fair ball which might even have touched a fielder but was windblown, lost in the sun or lights, or which falls to the ground because the fielder slips on either the field or an object on the field (mask, base, rubber, sprinkler, etc.),

6. on a fair line drive hit to the outfield which drops to the ground, where the outfielder is attempting the catch on the run, not in a set position; or any fair fly bail hit to the outfield which drops to the ground, where the outfielder either had to cover a considerable distance or make the catch while running at a high rate of speed (credit a hit even if the ball is touched),

7. on any fair ball not touched by a fielder that becomes "dead" because of touching the person or clothing of an umpire,

8. when no one covers the base or a fielder is late in coveting the base (use three feet as guideline to whether or not she got there), and

9. when a fair batted ball strikes a cap or glove thrown at it.

Do not credit a hit

1. when a batter misses first base and is then called out on an appeal, and

2. when a batter hits safely and a preceeding runner misses the first base she was advancing to, and is called out by appeal, (this is an appealed force out and batter is on by a fielder's choice).

 

 

Offense: Extra Base Hits


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1. Credit a batter with an extra base hit when she reaches a base beyond first base solely because of her hit,

a - if tagged out after over sliding, the batter does not get credit for that base, only the preceding base,

b - if tagged out after over running, the batter does get credit for that base, and

c - if a batter misses a base, she gets credit for only the bases she touched before missing the base.

2. A batter is credited only with the base she would have reached safely had no play on a preceding runner taken place. If she stops, sees another play, then advances, she does not receive credit for that base,

a - a batter never gets credit for a triple if a preceding runner at home is out, or would have been out had no error occurred, and the same applies for no double credit with an out or error at third base, and

b - if a fielder merely holds the ball too long, the batter gets credit for all bases she takes.

 

 

Offense: Game Ending Hits


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1. A hit that scores a winning run is credited with as many bases as the scoring runner traveled as long as the batter runs out her hit to the appropriate base and reaches there before the play at the plate is completed,

a - an out-of-the park homerun gets credit as a homerun as long as all runners touch all bases, and

b - if the winning run scores on a hoinerun, but a preceding runner stops running before reaching home (e,g., stops at 3b) the batter is credited with a double

 

 

Offense: Fielder's Choice


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Credit a fielder's choice

1. when a ball is put in play where a preceding runner is forced out on the hit, or would have been forced out had no error occurred,

2. when a ball is put in play where a preceding runner who is forced to advance, is called out on an appeal for missing the first base she was to advance to,

3 when a ball is put in play where a play is made on any lead runner and an out occurs, or an out would have occurred had no error taken place, or the runner is safe, but the batter would have been out had the initial play been made at first,

4. when a runner is checked and no throw is made (a mere checking of a lead runner, or faking a throw does not constitute a play, unless no throw is made, but when a check is followed by a throw and the hitter is safe, credit a hit),

5. when after reaching any base safely, a batter earns extra bases because of a play on a preceding runner (not scored as as a part of the original base or extra base hit),

6. when other runners advance while the catcher makes a play on the batter on a dropped third strike,

7. when a base is gained by a runner who is allowed to advance because of indifference (this does not necessarily apply in a first and third situation), and

8. when a fielder makes a play on a base she thought a runner was going to, but was wrong, the batter baserunner would have been out with an immediate play at first.

 

 

Offense: Sacrifices


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Score a sacrifice bunt

1. when with less than two outs, a batter advances one or more runners by bunting (include slap or slug bunting and running slaps), and is called out at first base or would have been out had no error occurred,

2. when with less than two outs, the defense, without error, fails to get the lead out on any type of bunt (sacrifice, slap/slug, running slap),

a - if any lead out is made on a runner trying to advance one base, prior to the runner reaching the base, no sacrifice is scored (fielder's choice), and

b - if the batter is obviously bunting for a bit in a situation where a sacrifice is normally not used (offensive team is way ahead), do not credit a sacrifice, credit a time at bat, and always give the batter the benefit of the doubt,

3. when the lead runner moves safely on a sacrifice bunt, but a rear runner is out,

4. when with runners on first and third, the pitcher fields a bunt, looks, holds the runner at third base, then gets the out at first base, and runner on first base moves safely to second base.

Do not credit a sacrifice bunt

1. when a moved runner on a bunt would have been out but for a good throw that was dropped,

2. if a batter dodges a pitch and inadvertently taps the ball into fair territory, moves a runner and is out or would have been out had no error occurred. (No sacrifice intent was there.)

Score a sacrifice fly

1. when with less than two outs, a batter hits a fly ball or line drive which scores a runner regardless of where the ball is caught, as long as it is in play. If dropping the catch allows the runner to score, a sacrifice is scored if she would have scored with a catch,

a - do not anticipate a perfect throw home,

b - do not anticipate a correctly executed relay,

c - if the catcher clearly has the bail in her possesion before the runner arrives and then drops it as the runner comes into the plate, the catcher should be charged with art error, and no run batted in or sacrifice fly is credited to the batter.

 

 

Offense: Runs Batted In (RBI)


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One run batted in is scored for each runner who scores on a batter's

a - safe hit,

b - sacrifice bunt or fly - if a runner gets into a rundown dining the sacrifice bunt or fly, then scores, no RBI is awarded,

c - ground out (not the third out of the inning),

d - fielder's choice,

e - walk with bases loaded,

f - being hit by a pitch with bases loaded,

g - being awarded first base because of interference or obstruction when the bases are loaded,

h - homerun (include batter as one RBI),

I - ball in play, which caused an error only if the runner would have scored without the error,

1) with a runner on first or second base where an error occurs on fielding an outfield ground ball, or throwing to a relay, credit an RBI only if the runner would have scored without the error,

2) if an error occurs in the above-mentioned situation, do not assume a perfect throw would have been made at the plate (give the batter the benefit of the doubt),

3) we can never assume a perfect throw when throwing off balance,

4) on an infield error on a play at another base, credit an RBI only if there were less than two out,

5) on a play at the plate where the run scores because either the throw is wild or the catcher never has clear possession of the ball ("bang-bang" play), an RBI is scored as well as a sacrifice fly,

6) no RBI is credited if the batter is out as the second out of a force double play, or would have been out had the receiver handled the ball, or if a reverse force double play occurs,

7) if a runner rounding third base stops, notices a misplay, then advances and scores, no RN is credited,

j - an RBI can be scored on a third out that is not a tag play only if that out is off a fly ball or line drive, the throw beats the runner to the base she is tagging up at, and the scoring runner crosses home plate before the third out is made,

k - a game winning RB! is the RBI that gives the team the lead that is never lost, (there is not always a GWRBI)

Offense: Batting Out of Order


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1. When an improper batter is discovered after she is out and before the next pitch, the proper batter is called out and is scored as if she was up. This does not affect credits of putouts or assists.

2. If an improper batter becomes a runner and then is discovered out of order, the proper batter is out and the putout is scored to the catcher.

3. If more than one batter bats out of turn in succession, score all play as it stands and skip the turn at bat of those who missed their turn.

 

 

Offense: Strikeouts


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The batter is charged with a strikeout

a - when her third strike is caught by the catcher before striking the dirt,

b - when she is put out running to first base on a dropped third strike,

c - when she safely advances to first base on a dropped third strike,

d - when she is out on a dropped third strike when she cannot legally advance to first base,

e - when a foul bunt on a third strike is not caught in the air,

f - when her turn at bat was interrupted after receiving two strikes and the subsequent batter struck out,

g - when after sharing a twit at bat with more than one other batter, none of whom received more than one strike, she receives the third strike, and

h - when the catcher catches a foul tip directly from the bat to the mitt on a third strike.

 

 

Offense: Stolen Bases


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Credit a stolen base to a runner who advances a base unaided by a safe hit, putout, error, force out, fielder's choice, illegal pitch, base on balls, hit batter, wild pitch, passed ball, interference or obstruction.

a - If the runner starts for the next base on the release of the pitch and the pitch results in what would otherwise be scored as a wild pitch or passed bail, credit her with a stolen base (if she gets a second base because of the wild pitch or passed bail score only the initial base as stolen).

b - When any runner is thrown out on an attempted double or triple steal, no runner will be credited with a stolen base.

1) On a double steal attempt in a first and third situation where an unsuccessful but legitimate effort is made to put out the runner stealing second base, credit a stolen base even if the runner on third is thrown out at home on a continuous play.

2) In a first and third double steal credit the runner advancing to second with a fielder's choice if the initial throw is to anywhere but second base.

3) In the first and third double steal, credit the runner advancing to second base with a stolen base if no throw is made (unless indifference because of a lopsided score was the cause of no defensive action), even if the advance was made immediately after rounding on a walk,

4) On double or triple steal attempts, if a runner is successful when played upon, all others who advance are also scored as having successfully stolen a base.

c - A stolen base is credited even if a wild throw would have resulted in a sure putout, had it not been wild. No error is charged unless another base is gained because of the throw.

d - if a runner who is attempting to steal, or who has been picked off a base. gets caught in a rundown and makes it safely to the next base without a defensive error, credit a stolen base only if the next base was unoccupied. If a succeeding runner advances, regardless of which base the lead runner ends on, credit her also with a stolen base or stolen bases.

e - If a runner is awarded a base during an attempted steal because of obstruction, no "caught stealing" should be charged, and a stolen base should be credited.

f - If a runner advances to a base because of a pick play on another runner, only score a stolen base If you are sure she broke for the next base prior to the release of the catcher's throw.

g - Do not credit a stolen base to a runner who advances because of defensive indifference; score a fielder's choice. (See noted exception for first and third situation above).

 

 

Offense: Caught Stealing (Unsuccessful Attempt)



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1. Charge a runner with "caught stealing" if she is put out or would have been put out had no error occurred,

a - on an attempted steal (next base must be unoccupied),

b - when a baserunner tries to advance after being picked off the base she was on (next base must be unoccupied), and

c - after over-sliding the base she attempted to steal.

2. If a runner attempting to steal is safe because the fielder did not handle a good throw, charge a "caught stealing" to the runner, an assist to the thrower and an error on the receiver.

3. If a runner sees the ball get away from the catcher, then tries to advance and is thrown out, a "caught stealing" should be charged.

 

 

 

Defense: Statistics



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The following defensive statistics can be kept on each player:

a - Putouts (PO),

b - Assists (A),

c - Errors (E),

d - Participation in double plays and triple plays(DP/TP) indicate inning,

e - Thrown out stealing (TO),

f - Throw out attempts (ATT),

g - Throw out average (TO%),

h - Pickoffs (PKO), and

i - Passed ball (PB).

 

 

Defense: Errors


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Guideline: Always ask, "Does the fielder deserve an error?" When answering always give benefit of the doubt to the hitter.

An error is charged

1. For each miscue/physical mistake, including fielding, wild throws, and missed catches of good throws, which prolongs the life of a batter, the life of a runner or which permits a runner to advance, including a dropped foul fly unless it was dropped intentionally to prevent a runner from advancing.

a - Receiving a throw or fielding a ground ball and not stepping on the base or not touching the player is an error on the fielder.

b - A single error is charged even if more than one base advance is gained as a result of it.

c - A wild throw in the dirt which hits a base or pitching rubber, a runner, an umpire or a fielder is an error on the thrower if a runner(s) advances.

d - An error is charged when an unnecessary throw allows a runner to advance.

e - An error is charged on a throw to a base where more than one fielder could have received a throw and neither did; charge the error to the fielder who should have received it.

f - An error is charged to any fielder committing interference or obstruction where an additional base is gained even if it is a different runner advancing to another base away from where the obstruction occurred. (i.e., Runners on first and third; fly ball to right, right fielder concedes run and throws to second base for a sure out there, meanwhile the third base runner collides with the pitcher, who is in the baseline to home. Prior to making the tag for the sure out at second, the shortstop throws home and the catcher tags the third base runner chit. Call obstruction on the pitcher, score the runner and score an error for the pitcher, since the first base runner advanced safely to second base because of her obstruction.

g - Merely fielding a ball too slowly is not an error.

h - A mental error is not recorded as an error.

i - Do not assume a perfect throw by the catcher in a pick-off or steal attempt. Even if the throw is wild, no error is recorded unless the baserunner advances an additional base as a result of the overthrow.

j - No error is charged on a wild throw in a rundown which allows a runner to retujir safely to her original base.

k - If a wild throw or dropped catch would not have been in time to cause an out, no error is charged unless an additional base is gained.

l - A wild throw, In an attempt to make a second or third out of a double or triple play is not recorded as an error unless a runner gets an additional base. A dropped ball by the receiver in this situation is credited as an error.

m - No error is charged if an out is made on that immediate play, even if it changes the option of getting a lead out to getting an out behind the lead

n - No error is charged on a misplay if the ball is lost in the sun or lights, windblown, or if the fielder slips and falls, even if contact with the ball is made.

o - No error is charged when a ball is misplayed that was hit so hard more than ordinary effort is needed to play the ball. If the ball goes in the pocket of the glove and then Is dropped, score an error if an out would have been made without the drop, except as noted in q.

p - No error is charged if a fly ball is misjudged and the fielder can't recover in time to field it in good position.

q - No error is charged if the fielder drops a ball after running a considerable distance to catch it, or if she fails in her attempt to catch it while running at a high rate of speed.

r - No error is charged on a dropped line drive if the fielder moved more than a few steps to catch it.

s - Throwtt'g to a wrong base is a mental mistake and is not charged as an error.

t - A runner reaching first base safely as a result of a dropped third strike is scored as either a wild pitch or passed ball, not an error, unless the ball is picked up in time that an accurate throw or catch would have resulted in an out.

u - No error is charged if other runners advance on a dropped third strike when the batter is out. No error is charged when the batter is not out. A passed ball or wild pitch is charged.

V - illegal pitches, wild pitches, passed balls or hit batters are not recorded as errors, even if more than one base is gained from the initial misplay.

w - Consider the distance of the mound from the plate and what the pitcher's primary duty is. If she mishandles a sharply batted ball, do not credit her with an error. You may credit her with an error on a mishandled slow roller, bunt, or wild throw.

x - If two fielders are running to field a fly ball, one catches it and the second one hits her and causes her to drop it, credit the error to the player who collided with the player who initially caught the ball.

y - Score an error on the thrower when an otherwise good throw hits a runner, umpire or bat.

z - If a baseplayer makes it to within three feet of the base on a force out, and neglects to touch the base when the throw was in time, charge an error on the baseplayer receiving the good throw.

 

 

Defense: Putouts


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Credited to a fielder

a - who catches a fly ball or line drive (fair or foul),

b - who tags out a runner, or

c - who tags the base and forces out the runner,

Credited to the catcher

a - when the batter is called out for an illegally batted ball,

b - when she legally catches a third strike,

c - when a batter is out on a third strike foul bunt,

d - when a batter is out for being touched by her own batted ball,

e - when the batter is called out for interfering with the catcher,

f - when the batter is called out for batting out of order,

g - when the batter is called out for not touching first base after a base on balls,

h - when the runner is called out for not completing her advance to home plate for the wlnnmg run,

i - when the batter-baserunner runs backwards in the first baseline to avoid a tag,

j - when the batter interfers with the catcher,

k - when the batter refuses to touch first base after receiveng a base on balls,

l - when a runner refuses to advance from third to home and she is the deciding run, or

m - when she steps on home plate with the ball in her possession after a dropped third strike with bases loaded,

Credited to the nearest fielder

a - when a batter is out on an infield fly which is not caught (fielder nearest the ball),

b - when a runner is out for being hit by a fairly batted ball,

c - when a runner is called out for being out of the baseline to avoid a tag (fielder attempting to make the tag),

d - when a runner is out for passing another runner (fielder nearest to where the runner was passed),

e - when a runner is out for running the bases in reverse order (fielder covering the base the runner left when reversing),

f - when a runner is out for interfering with a fielder attempting to make a throw (fielder who was to receive the throw/fielder gets an assist), or

g - when a batter is also out because of a preceding runner interfering with a fielder (whoever was to receive the throw at first base; if the fielder was throwing, fielder gets an assist).

 

 

Defense: Assists


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1. An assist is credited to any fielder who deflects a batted or thrown ball and whose deflection helps make a putout possible, or the putout would have occurred had no succeeding error taken place.

2. An assist is credited to any fielder who throws a ball that results in a putout or would have resulted in a putout had no succeeding error occurred. If multiple throws are made, each fielder handling the ball is credited with one, but not more than one, assist.

3. An assist is credited to any fielder who throws or deflects a ball that results in a runner being called out for interference or for running out of the baseline.

4. An assist is credited to a fielder who makes a wild throw, and after that throw, the runner who is trying to advance to the next base is out before reaching that base. If the runner reaches the next base safely and is out trying to make yet another base on the same play, credit the initial fielder with an error- Everything resulting after the error is a new play and should be scored as such.

5. An assist is credited to any fielder who makes a throw which should have resulted in an out but was dropped.

6. A pitcher is not credited with an assist because of merely pitching the ball which initiated the play.

7. The pitcher does not get an assist on a strikeout or on a throw out.

 

 

Defense: Double Play/Triple Play


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1. A double or triple play occurs when two or three players are put out between when a pitch is delivered and the next thne the ball either becomes dead or is in the possession of the pitcher in her pitching motion- Play must be continuous.

2. If an error or misplay occurs between putouts, no double or triple play occurs,

3. If an appeal results in a second or third out, even after the pitcher has the ball in her possession, but before she throw the next pitch, a double or triple play should be credited.

4. The initial fielder of a ground bail is credited with one assist; if she throws for the out; the first receiver iii a doubleplay, or first and second receiver in a triple play, is/are credited with first a putout and then an assist; the final receiver is credited with a putout. In a double or triple play, the initial fielder of a line drive or fly ball is credited with first a putout, and then an assist if a throw is made, or another putout if a tag is made. Subsequent fielders involved receive credit as described on the preceding ground ball situation.

5. Never assume the second part of a double play. If an overthrow is made, no error is recorded unless the runner gets another base on the overthrow. If, on the second out a catchabie throw is dropped, then an error is recorded for the person receiving the throw.

6. A force double play is one where both outs are force outs. A reverse force double play is one where the first out is at first and the second out is made by tagging a runner who was originally forced off, before the runner reaches the base to which she was forced,

 

 

Defense: Throw Outs


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1. A throw in front of a runner by a catcher which results in a ru.ndowit is recorded as a throw out regardless of the base where the putout occurs.

2. Credit the catcher with a throw out or throw out attempt whenever she initiates the play on an attempted stolen base, and an out results. She should also be credited with a throw out attempt if she opts not to throw, (unless a pitch is in the dirt or a passed ball). If she fakes to attempt a play on another runner, no throw out attempt is recorded.

3. A throw behind a runner that results in an out is a pick-off. If the runner attempts to advance on the throw and is subsequently out, it becomes a stolen base attempt, and credit a throw out to the catcher.

4. If a good steal throw is dropped, and an error charged, credit the catcher with a throw out.

 

 

Pitching: Statistics


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The followmg pitching statistics can be kept on each pitcher:

a - Earned run average (ERA),

b - Games played (C),

c - Games started (CS),

d - Wins ON),

e - Losses (L),

f - Winning percentage (Per),

g - Saves (SV),

h - Games completed (CC) pitched the distance,

i - Shutouts (SF10).

j - Innings pitched (IP),

k - Runs allowed (B),

l - Hits allowed (H) - separate doubles (28), triples (38) and homeruns (HR),

m - Earned runs allowed (ER),

n - Batters struck out (SO),

o - Batters walked (SB)- indicate batters intentionally walked (188),

p - illegal pitches (BK),

q - Total bases allowed by hits (TB),

r - Slugging percentage of opponents (SLA, or

s - Opponent's total at bats (AB),

t - Opponent's batting average (BA),

u - Opponent's fly outs (FO),

V - Opponent's ground outs (GO),

w - Batter's faced (HF),

x - Hit batters by pitch (FJBP), record names of those hit, and

y - Wild pitch (pitcher's fault) (WP)

 

 

Pitching: Earned Runs


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1. Earned runs are scored for all runs for which the pitcher is held accountable.

2. Earned runs are determined by reconstructing the inning as it would have been played without errors and passed balls (including errors on the pitcher).

3. When in doubt, always give the benefit of the doubt to the pitcher when deciding which bases would have been reached by errorless play. Never assume runners would have gotten extra bases on a hit unless it is obvious.

4. When reconstructing a run that scores to end the game, but on a play where an error occured, and with less than two outs, use your judgement considering outs, who was up, etc. to decide if that run might have scored had the game continued.

5. Bases gained by the following, and where the runner scores, result in an earned run (defensive interference is considered an opportunity for a putout):

a - Hit,

b - Sacrifice bunt or sacrifice fly,

c - Stolen base,

d - Fielder's choke (putouts on succeeding runner),

e - Bases on balls,

f - Batters hit by pitch,

g - illegal pitch, and

h - Wild pitch (including a third strike wild pitch where the batter reaches first base safely).

6. The run is unearned (scores in spite of pitching efforts) if the runner who scores reached first base in the following ways:

a - On an error,

b - After her life at the plate was prolonged by a dropped foul fly, or

c - On interference or obstruction (the interference or obstruction should be counted as an opportunity for a putout).

7. The run is unearned if the runner who scores has her baserunning life prolonged by an error, and would have been put out by errorless play. Never assume the second out of a double play should have been completed unless a caught throw is dropped.

8. The run is unearned if a runner who advances by an error, passed ball, or defensive interference/obstruction, would not have scored without the misplay.

9. A relief pitcher does not receive benefit of previous chances for outs when reconstructing the inning in determining earned or unearned runs she put on, while the original pitcher does. Thus, a relief pitcher could be charged With an eajited run which does not appear in the team totals,

10. If a tie-breaker runner scores from second base and the pitcher is held accountable for all bases gained, score the run eal ned but do not charge it to that pitcher, charge it to the team. (See tiebreaker scoring on page 32).

11. The run is unearned if there is an error on a play at home.

12. A batter that is on by a fielder's choice can only score an earned run if the runner who was played on with the fielder's choice, was a potential earned run.

 

 

Pitching: Charging Runs Scored (When Relief Pitchers Are Used)

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1. A pitcher is charged With every run which scores where the batter reached base while she was pitching.

2. A pitcher is charged With any run which scores where the batter reached base safely as a result of a fielder's choice putout of a runner who reached base while she was pitching. Charge a pitcher with the number of runners she put on, not the individuals she put on.

3. If a pitcher leaves the game with runners on base, she is charged with up to that many runs that score in that inning, unless any of those runners are out because of being picked off, thrown out on an attempted steal, or for interference when a batter doesn't reach first base on the play.

4. When a relief pitcher comes in mid-count, and that batter gets on, then scores,

a - charge the first pitcher With the run only if the batter got on with a walk after earning a count with two or three balls and less than two strikes from the initial pitcher, and

b - charge the relief pitcher With the run any other time.

 

Pitching: Strikeouts

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1. The pitcher who throws the third strike is credited with the shikeout,

2. The pitcher is credited with a strikeout even if the batter reaches first on the dropped third strike rule. Score KPB or KWP, whichever the case.

 

 

Pitching: Bases On Balls

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When a relief pitcher comes in mid-count, and the batter then reaches first base on a base on balls, the original pitcher is credited with the walk if she pitched at least two balls and less than two strikes to the batter, or if the count was full.

 

 

Pitching: Wild Pitches/Passed Balls



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1. A wild pitch is charged to the pitcher when the pitcher throws so high, wide or low that the catcher can not handle the ball with ordinary effort and at least one runner advances.

a - Any pitch in the dirt which advances a runner is deemed wild.

b - Only one wild pitch is scored regardless of the number of runners who advance or the number of bases advanced.

c - A third strike that is not handled by the catcher because it was wild, where the batter makes first base safely, is charged to the pitcher as a strikeout and also as a wild pitch (KWP).

d - No wild pitch is scored if a runner was stealing on the release of the wild pitch and only one base is advanced.

2. A passed ball is charged to the catcher when she fails to catch a pitch which could have been caught with ordinary effort and at least one baserunner advances.

a - A bobbled pitch (not dropped) where a runner advances is scored as a stolen base, not a passed ball, even if the runner decides to advance after seeing the bobble.

b - Only one passed ball is charged regardless of the number of runners who advance or the number of bases advanced.

c - A third strike that is not handled by the catcher and which should have been with ordinary effort, and the batter reaches first base safely, is charged to the catcher as a passed ball and the pitcher as a strikeout (KPB).

d - No passed ball is scored if a runner was stealing on the release of the pitch that got away and only one base is earned.

 

 

Pitching: Winning and Losing Pitcher



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1. Credit the starting pitcher With a Win if she has pitched at least four total innings, is ahead when replaced, and if the team stays ahead for the rest of the game.

2. When a regulation game ends after five innings, the starting pitcher must pitch three innings and her team must win in order to be credited with the win.

3. If the starting pitcher can't receive credit for the Win (not enough innings or her team falls behind after she leaves), credit a single relief pitcher with the win.

4. If the starting pitcher can't receive credit for the Win (not enough innings or her team falls behind after she leaves), and more than one relief pitcher is used

a - if the lead is never lost, credit the relief pitcher whose pitching is most effective with the win, or

b - if the score is tied or the eventual winning team falls behind, the relief pitcher who is the pitcher of record when her team gains the lead and stays in the lead thereafter, is credited with the win (Exception .- a brief or ineffective appearance followed by another reliever who is effective in maintaining the lead does not receive credit for the win; the effective reliever does).

5. No pitcher can receive credit for a win if the score becomes tied or her team falls behind after she leaves the game, unless she comes back in and regains the lead.

6. If a pitcher is removed from the game offensively by a batter or runner, all runs scored by her team are credited to her benefit in determining when her team is in the lead.

7. A shutout is scored by pitching scoreless ball for the entire game or if the pitcher did the same after relieving in the first inning before any outs or any score, (If two or more pitchers combine for a shutout, note it in the record).

8. The starting pitcher receives a loss if she is relieved while her team is behind and her team remains behind, regardless of the number of innings pitched.

9. A relief pitcher is the losing pitcher if she is the pitcher of record when the opponents go ahead and stay ahead the rest of the game, NOTE: When determining the score of the game when a pitcher is replaced, include runs for which the replaced pitcher is charged even if they have not yet scored.

 

 

Pitching: Saves


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1. A pitcher must meet all three of the following conditions to be credited with a save:

a - She is the last pitcher in the win, and

b - She is not the winning pitcher, and

c - She meets one of the following:

1) She enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and pitches for at least One inning, or

2) She pitches effectively for at least three innings, or

3) She enters the game with the potential tieing run either on base, at bat or on deck.

2. No more than one save may be credited in a game.

 

 

Scoring The Tie-Breaker

From the A.S.A. Scorer's Manual

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At the start of each half inning under the tie-breaker rule a mythical pitcher, called TEAM, "permits" the last opposition batter of the previous inning to reach second base. TEAM is then "relieved" by the actual pitch. The runner starting off second base is the responsibility of TEAM.

If action by a subsequent batter, such as a fielder's choice, causes the lead-off runner to be put out, the FmST run scored that half inning may be charged to TEAM. If the lead-off runner is put out with out action by the batter, such as caught stealing or leaving the base too soon, then no run can be charged to TEAM.

Any run scored after the first run in a tie-breaker half inning MUST be charged to an actual pitcher as either earned or uneajited. A run charged to TEAM is neither earned or unearned because there is no actual person to whom the run is to be charged and it is technically impossible for TEAM to have an ea, ted run average because TEAM will always have ZERO total innings pitched (never gets an out) and the attempted division by zero in the ERA formula is mathematically impossible.

In the statistical pitching summary for a game using the tie-breaker rule, TEAM is listed as a pitcher. The ONLY statistic recorded for team is total runs allowed, but neither earned or unearned runs can be recorded. Thus, the total runs allowed by a team may exceed the sum total of earned and unea, ned runs. Futhennore, the box score will not prove as it normally does, since there is an extra runner left on base, usually, for each inning the rule is in effect.